Mickey Mantle: The greatest switch hitter in baseball

Yankee slugger Mickey Mantle awaits his turn in the batting cage at Yankee Stadium before the fifth World Series game against the St. Louis Cardinals, Oct. 12, 1964.

Table of Contents

PositionCenterfielder and First Baseman
Active years1951-1968
MLB Teams (years)New York Yankees (1951–1968)
DebutApril 17, 1951 (Age 19 vs. Boston Red Sox)
Last gameSeptember 28, 1968 (Age 36 vs. Boston Red Sox)
Date of BirthOctober 20, 1931
Native placeSpavinaw, OK
BattedBoth
ThrewRight
All-Star×20 (1952–1965, 1967, 1968)
World Champions×7 (1951–1953, 1956, 1958, 1961, 1962)
AL MVP×3 (1956, 1957, 1962)
Number retiredNew York Yankees No. 7
Hall of Fame year1974 (322/365 BBWAA votes)
MLB AwardsTriple Crown (1956)
Gold Glove Award (1962)
AL batting champion (1956)
4× AL home run leader (1955, 1956, 1958, 1960)
AL RBI leader (1956)
Monument Park honoree
Major League Baseball All-Century Team
LegacyOklahoma Hall of Fame in 1964
Featured on a United States postage stamp
Golden Plate Award of the American Academy of Achievement
NicknameThe Mick, The Commerce Comet, or Muscles

The Bio

The Majestic Player

Mickey Mantle was one of the most famous and talented baseball players of all time. His drive and love for the game pushed him past injuries and into the record books. From 1951 to 1968, Mantle played center field, right field, and first base for the New York Yankees in Major League Baseball (MLB). Mantle was one of the best players and sluggers, and many people think he was the best switch-hitter ever. Mantle was put into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974, and the Major League Baseball All-Century Team was chosen for him in 1999. In 1956, Mickey Mantle led the major leagues in batting average (.353), home runs (52), and runs batted in ((130 RBI) to win the Triple Crown.

Mickey Mantle was an All-Star for 16 seasons and played in 16 of the 20 All-Star Games that were held during his career. He was named the Most Valuable Player (MVP) of the American League (AL) three times and won a Gold Glove once. Mantle played in 12 World Series, and he won seven of them. He still holds the records for the most home runs (18), RBIs (40), extra-base hits (26), runs (42), walks (43), and total bases in a World Series (123).

Mickey Mantle was one of the best offensive threats of any center fielder in baseball history. The switch-hitter continues to have “the second-highest career OPS+ among center fielders.” The first position belongs to Mike Trout. When Mantle retired, he boasted the best stolen-base percentage in MLB then. Also, compared to the other four center fielders on the All-Century team, Mickey Mantle’s career rate of grounding into double plays was the lowest, and he had the highest on-base percentage and slugging percentage in the World Series.

Mickey Mantle could hit for both average and power. His home runs gave rise to the term “tape-measure homes” when a play-by-play announcer reacted to one of Mantle’s home runs in 1953. He hit 536 home runs in his career and hit at least .300 ten times. Mickey Mantle is tied with Jim Thome for the most walk-off home runs in his career, with 13. Twelve of them came in the regular season, and one came in the playoffs. He is the only player in baseball history to hit 150 home runs from both sides of the plate.

Born to play

Even before he was born, Mickey Mantle was getting ready for his life as a major league baseball player. Father Elvin Mantle was a semi-pro player. He said that if he had a son, he would name him Mickey after the best catcher in baseball at the time, Mickey Cochrane. So, when Mutt’s wife, Lovell, gave birth to a boy in Spavinaw, Oklahoma, on October 20, 1931, they gave him the name Mickey Charles Mantle. He went on to become a famous baseball player. Mickey Mantle also liked to play football, but he got hurt early in his freshman year of high school, which almost cost him his life and put an end to his football career. During a football game, a teammate kicked him in the lower leg. In just a few hours, his ankle swelled up to three times its normal size, and he got a fever of 104 degrees. His parents took the 14-year-old to the local hospital, where doctors told them he had “osteomyelitis, a potentially fatal bone disease that had gotten worse because of the injury.” Doctors told the Mantles that the child’s life could only be saved by cutting off the leg.

The parents of Mickey Mantle went to the Crippled Children’s Hospital in Oklahoma City to get a second opinion. Doctors there agreed that he had osteomyelitis, but their treatment plan was much less extreme: eight shots a day of a new miracle drug called penicillin. Mickey’s ankle stopped hurting after a week, and he was soon back playing sports. His time playing football was over, but he was just getting started with baseball.

The chance

By the time Mickey Mantle was 15 and was a player for the Baxter Springs Whiz Kids. Tom Greenwade, a scout for the New York Yankees, came to Baxter Springs at the end of the 1948 season to check out Billy Johnson, the third baseman on Mantle’s team. But he quickly turned his attention to the 16-year-old shortstop who hit two long home runs, one with his right hand and the other with his left. Both went into a creek that was a long way from the outfield fence. Greenwood went up to Mantle after the game and asked, “How’d you like to play for the Yankees?” Both Mickey Mantle and his father were shocked at first, but they soon got excited about Mickey joining the Yankees. Greenwade told Mickey that since he was only 16 years old, the Yankees couldn’t sign him until he graduated from high school.

Mickey Mantle got his first taste of the big leagues on September 17, 1950, when the Yankees called him up. When Joe DiMaggio said on March 1 that 1951 would be his last season, he turned up the heat. The next day, manager Casey Stengel told the press that Mantle would succeed DiMaggio. Even though he was suddenly put under a lot of pressure, Mantle did well in spring training. During batting practice, he hit huge home runs, and during running drills, he left his teammates in the dust.

Stengel was amazed, and he saw the future of the Yankees in the 19-year-old who had never even stepped to the plate in a major-league game.

“He’s faster than any power hitter I’ve ever seen and stronger than any speedster I’ve ever seen. No one has ever had more of both speed and power at the same time. This kid isn’t making sense. He does too well. It’s very hard to understand,” the manager said.

Mickey Mantle’s first game in the major leagues was on April 17, 1951, against the Boston Red Sox at Yankee Stadium. Even though he had a good start to the season, hitting well in April and early May, he had a terrible June and early July, so Stengel sent him back to the minor leagues to get more experience. It got Mantle fired up, and for the next two months, he played really well for the Yankees’ Triple-A team in Kansas City. By the end of August, Mantle had played 40 games for Kansas City and hit .361 with 11 home runs and 60 RBIs. The Yankees then called him back. Upon his return, Mickey Mantle was assigned uniform number 7, which he would wear for the next 18 years. Mantle hit.284 with six home runs and 20 RBIs in the last 27 games of the season.

The Yankees won the American League pennant on September 28. In the World Series, they played the New York Giants, who play in the city across the street. In the fifth inning of Game Two, Willie Mays, a rookie for the Giants, hit a fly ball halfway between Mickey Mantle and Joe DiMaggio in right-center field. During the chase, Mickey tore the ligaments in his knee so badly that he had to have surgery.

Became the greatest switch hitter in baseball

In 1952, Mickey Mantle went back to the Yankees and took over for Joe DiMaggio in center field. He hit a ball. 311 and hit 23 home runs, drove in 87 runs, and scored 94 runs. He made the All-Star team for the first of 18 straight years.

The switch-hitter averaged 28 home runs, 98 RBI, and 118 runs per season from 1953 to 1955. In 1954, Mickey Mantle had 129 runs, which was the most in the American League. In 1955, he had 37 home runs, a.431 on-base percentage, and a.611 slugging percentage, which was the most in the AL. In 1956, he hit .353 and had 52 home runs and 130 RBI. Mickey Mantle also won the AL Triple Crown and the first of two AL Most Valuable Player Awards in a row. In his first eight years with the Yankees, they won seven American League pennants and five World Series.

According to the Society for American Baseball Research, “in the days before instant replay, electronic measuring tools, and landmark distances carved into outfield concourses, no player’s home runs caused more stories, controversy, myths, and legends than Mickey Mantle’s.” This began in 1948 when Tom Greenwade found him. It reached the pinnacle at Griffith Stadium where he hit his biggest home run. Mantle lifted the Senators’ Chuck Stobbs throw to a massive height on April 17, 1953.

Mickey Mantle won the Triple Crown in 1956. He led the major leagues in batting average (.353), home runs (52), and RBIs (130). He also led the league in runs scored (132) and was named the AL’s Most Valuable Player. The Yankees beat the Dodgers in seven games in the World Series. Don Larsen’s perfect game was the best part. Mantle made six runs, including three homers and four drives.

Even though he was always hurting, Mantle kept doing well over the next four seasons. In 1957, he won his second MVP award, another home run title, and two more pennants. The Yankees got Roger Maris from the Kansas City Athletics to improve their offense following their relegation to the third position. But the 296-foot right-field wall at Yankee Stadium made Maris, a left-handed pull hitter, a perfect fit for the Yankees. They were right in the end.

Mickey Mantle vs. Roger Maris

In 1960, the Yankees came back and won the pennant with Maris and Mantle in their lineup. Mickey Mantle led the league in home runs with 40 and runs scored with 119, but Maris won the most valuable player award in the closest vote ever. Mantle had a great World Series, hitting .400 with three home runs and 11 RBIs. However, the Yankees lost to the Pittsburgh Pirates when Pittsburgh second baseman Bill Mazeroski hit a dramatic walk-off home run in Game Seven.

During the famous home-run chase of 1961, Mickey Mantle was the media’s favorite to win. Most New York sportswriters thought he was the “Real Yankee,” a player who deserved to break the record. Maris was seen as an outsider who was trying to steal the crown from Babe Ruth‘s rightful heir apparent because he was often shown in the media to be grumpy and angry.

All season, Maris and Mantle were tied for most home runs. With 18 games left in the season on September 10, Maris had 56 home runs and Mantle had 53. But the expected race down the last stretch did not happen. Mickey Mantle’s muscles had been stiff and sore for weeks, and then he got a bad cold that made him tired and kept him from playing in four games from September 19 to September 22. On September 23, he went back to play in Boston, and in his first at-bat, against Don Schwall, he hit his 54th home run. But the next day, Mickey Mantle didn’t hit at all and was taken out of the game in the sixth inning because he was sick. Due to side effects from his medicine, he missed ten of the Yankees’ last 12 games. He hit 54 home runs by the end of the season.

Mickey Mantle missed 39 games in 1962, but he still won his third MVP award and led New York to its third straight pennant and second straight world title. He hit .321 and had 30 home runs, 89 RBIs, and 96 runs scored that year. He also had the highest on-base percentage (.486) and slugging percentage (.605) in the league. In seven games, the Yankees beat the San Francisco Giants to win the World Series. During that winter, the Yankees dug deep and gave Mantle a $100,000 contract. Mickey Mantle was only the fifth player in history to get a deal worth that much.

On May 22, 1963, the Yankees and Athletics were playing Kansas City at Yankee Stadium. The score was 7-7 going into the bottom of the 11th inning. Mickey Mantle hit left-handed, and a fastball from Bill Fischer hit the right-field roof just two feet from the top. He said it was the most difficult ball he had ever hit. Fans, experts, eyewitnesses, scientists, and charlatans have been arguing for years about how far the ball would have gone if it hadn’t hit the building. Estimates range from 475 feet to 734 feet, with the most likely being in the middle 500s.

Mickey Mantle did well in 1964 because he stayed healthy and hit well. He hit .303 with 35 home runs, 111 RBIs, and a .423 on-base percentage, which was the best in the league. His team had its fifth straight pennant though the St. Louis Cardinals beat them in the World Series. As of the 2011 World Series, he still held the record with 18 home runs in the World Series.

The dusk

On September 25, 1968, Mickey Mantle appeared for the final time as a player at Yankee Stadium. He ended his career with the last game three days later. On March 1, 1969, exactly 18 years after Joe DiMaggio said that 1951 would be his last year playing baseball, Mantle also said that he would no longer play. Mickey Mantle Day was held at the Stadium on June 8. Mantle’s number 7, which he wore for many years, was retired at the ceremony, which was attended by more than 70,000 fans. He joined other great players whose numbers had already been retired (Ruth, Gehrig, and DiMaggio).

Mickey Mantle quit baseball with a batting average of .298, 536 home runs, 1,676 runs scored, 1,509 RBI, 1,733 walks, and 1,509 runs batted in. An All-Star twenty times, the hitter got the Gold Glove award in 1962 and had seven World Series rings. In the Fall Classic, he played 12 times and hit a record 18 home runs.

In 1973, at the Old-Timers Game at Yankee Stadium, Mantle faced his old friend Whitey Ford. Mantle batted right-handed, and Ford batted left-handed. After fouling off a few pitches, he hit a huge home run over the 402-foot sign by the bullpen. Some people think that this is now his last home run at Yankee Stadium.

In 1974, Mantle was chosen for the Hall of Fame. Mantle was told he had hepatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, and liver cancer on January 7, 1994. On August 13, 1995, he died.

Mickey Mantle’s Greatest Moments

  • 16-time AL All-Star (1952-1965, 1967 & 1968)
  • 3-time AL MVP (1956, 1957 & 1962)
  • AL Triple Crown (1956)
  • AL Gold Glove Winner (1962)
  • AL Batting Average Leader (1956)
  • 3-time AL On-Base Percentage Leader (1955, 1962 & 1964)
  • 4-time AL Slugging Percentage Leader (1955, 1956, 1961 & 1962)
  • 6-time AL OPS Leader (1952, 1955, 1956, 1960, 1962 & 1964)
  • 5-time AL Runs Scored Leader (1954, 1956-1958 & 1960)
  • 3-time AL Total Bases Leader (1956, 1958 & 1960)
  • AL Triples Leader (1955)
  • 4-time AL Home Runs Leader (1955, 1956, 1958 & 1960)
  • AL RBI Leader (1956)
  • 5-time AL Bases on Balls Leader (1955, 1957, 1958, 1961 & 1962)
  • 20-Home Run Seasons: 14 (1952-1962, 1964, 1966 & 1967)
  • 30-Home Run Seasons: 9 (1955-1962 & 1964)
  • 40-Home Run Seasons: 4 (1956, 1958, 1960 & 1961)
  • 50-Home Run Seasons: 2 (1956 & 1961)
  • 100 RBI Seasons: 4 (1954, 1956, 1961 & 1964)
  • 100 Runs Scored Seasons: 9 (1953-1961)
  • Won seven World Series with the New York Yankees (1951, 1952, 1953, 1956, 1958, 1961 & 1962)
  • Baseball Hall of Fame: Class of 1974

FAQs about Mickey Mantle

How tall was Mickey Mantle?

1.82 m

What position did Mickey Mantle play?

First baseman, Center fielder

How many times was Mickey Mantle an All-Star?

He was named to 20 All-Star Games.

What number has Mickey Mantle’s shirt?

7

How much is a Mickey Mantle baseball card?

$12.6 million

How much is a Mickey Mantle rookie card?

Mickey Mantle’s rookie card sells for a record-breaking $12.6 million.

When did Mickey Mantle die?

August 13, 1995

Why are Mickey Mantle cards so expensive?

Mantle card is very rare, as the Topps printed cards No. 311-407 in small numbers only in 1952.

What year was Mickey Mantle a rookie?

1951

How many 1952 Mickey Mantle cards exist?

About 1,800 Mickey Mantle rookie cards do exist.

How old was Mickey Mantle when he died?

63 years

How much did Mickey Mantle drink?

Mickey Mantle once said: “If I had a drink to start the day, I’d go out for lunch and go through three or four bottles of wine in the course of the afternoon,”

How did Mickey Mantle die?

Liver cancer

When did Mickey Mantle retire?

March 1, 1969

Which Mickey Mantle cards are worth the money?

The Holy Grail: 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle.
1951 Bowman Mickey Mantle – The Rookie Card!
1952 Berk Ross Mickey Mantle.
1952 Bowman Mickey Mantle #101.
1953 Bowman Mickey Mantle #59.
1953 Topps Mickey Mantle #82.
1956 Topps Mickey Mantle #135.
1991 Score Mantle Auto.

How much is a Mickey Mantle-signed baseball worth?

The average value of a “Mickey Mantle autographed ball” is $476.47. Sold between $25.00 and $1,500.00.

How much is a Mickey Mantle-signed baseball worth?

The average value of a “Mickey Mantle autographed ball” is $476.47. Sold between $25.00 and $1,500.00.

How much is Mickey Mantle’s signature worth?

A Mickey Mantle’s signed photo fetches about $150. -$300.

Where is Mickey Mantle buried?

Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery

Why is Mickey Mantle so famous?

Mickey Mantle is famous for his remarkable power and speed in hitting.

How many home runs did Mickey Mantle hit in 1961?

54 home runs

Where did Mickey Mantle go to school?

The University of Oklahoma

How many world series did Mickey Mantle win?

7

How many hits did Mickey Mantle have?

2,415 hits

The Stats

SUMMARYWARABHHRBARRBISBOBPSLGOPSOPS+
Career110.281022415536.29816761509153.421.557.977172

Mickey Mantle’s Standard Batting Record

YearGPAABRH2B3BHRRBISBCSBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSOPS+TBGDPHBPSHSFIBBPos
19519638634161911151365874374.267.349.443.79211715130229H/8
19521426265499417137723874175111.311.394.530.92416229150210*89/5H
19531275404611051362432192847990.295.398.497.8951452292003*8/H976
195414665154312916317122710252102107.300.408.525.93315828530247*8/6H49
1955147638517121158251137998111397.306.431.6111.04218031643236*8/H6
19561506525331321882255213010111299.353.464.7051.16921037642146*8/H
1957144623474121173286349416314675.365.512.6651.177221315500323*8/H
19581506545191271582114297183129120.304.443.5921.0351883071122213*8
1959144640541104154234317521393126.285.390.514.90415127872126*8/H
19601536445271191451764094143111125.275.399.558.957162294111056*8/H
196115364651413116316654128121126112.317.448.6871.13520635320159*8/H
19621235023779612115130899012278.321.486.6051.09119522841029*89/H
1963652131724054801535214032.314.441.6221.063196107500148H
196414356746592141252351116399102.303.423.5911.015177275900318*879H
196512243536144921211946417376.255.379.452.8311371631100177H
196610839333340961212356115776.288.389.538.927170179900358H/7
196714455344063108170225511107113.245.391.434.82515019191057*3H
19681445474355710314118546210697.237.385.398.78214317391147*3H
18 Yrs240199108102167624153447253615091533817331710.298.421.557.9771724511113131447148 
162 Game Avg.16266954711316323536102103117115.298.421.557.977172304811 10 
 GPAABRH2B3BHRRBISBCSBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSOPS+TBGDPHBPSHSFIBBPos

Mickey Mantle’s Postseason Batting Record

YearGPAABRH2B3BHRRBISBCSBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSTBGDPHBPSHSFIBBWPAcWPA
19512751100000021.200.429.200.629100000.082.5%
19527322951011230034.345.406.6551.0611900000.3329.0%
1953627243500270138.208.296.458.7551100010.2614.3%
1955310101200110002.200.200.500.700510000-0.10-6.1%
1956730246610341065.250.400.6671.06716100010.132.0%
1957622193500120231.263.364.421.785800000-0.05-4.0%
1958731244601230074.250.419.5831.00314000010.07-5.2%
196073325810103110189.400.545.8001.34520000020.5236.7%
19612660100000002.167.167.167.333100000-0.04-0.9%
1962729252310002045.120.241.160.401400000-0.04-2.0%
1963416151200110015.133.188.333.521500000-0.12-5.1%
1964730248820380068.333.467.7921.25819000010.5322.4%
12 Yrs (12 Series)652732304259621840344354.257.374.535.908123200061.5683.5%
12 WS652732304259621840344354.257.374.535.908123200061.5683.5%

Mickey Mantle’s Career Graph

Hall of FameAll-Star GamesAwardsMVP (rank, share)
1974 BBWAA (88.2%)
Selected to HOF in 1974 by BBWAA
1952
1953 (CF)
1954 (CF)
1955 (CF)
1956 (CF)
1957 (CF)
1958 (CF)
1959-1 *
1959-2 (CF)
1960-1 (CF)
1960-2 (CF)
1961-1 (CF)
1961-2 (CF)
1962-1 (RF)
1962-2
1963
1964 (CF)
1965
1967 *
1968 *
1952 AP All-Star
1952 TSN All-Star
1956 AP All-Star
1956 TSN All-Star
1956 AL Triple Crown
1956 AL MVP
1956 Major League Player of the Year
1956 AL Batting Title
1957 AL MVP
1957 AP All-Star
1957 TSN All-Star
1958 AP All-Star
1961 AP All-Star
1961 TSN All-Star
1962 AL MVP
1962 AL TSN All-Star
1964 AP All-Star
1964 AL TSN All-Star
1965 Hutch Award
1952 AL (3, 43%)
1953 AL (22, 1%)
1954 AL (15, 5%)
1955 AL (5, 34%)
1956 AL (1, 100%)
1957 AL (1, 69%)
1958 AL (5, 38%)
1959 AL (17, 4%)
1960 AL (2, 66%)
1961 AL (2, 71%)
1962 AL (1, 84%)
1964 AL (2, 61%)
1965 AL (25, 1%)
1966 AL (19, 2%)
3 MVPs
5.79 Career Shares (7th)
Gold GlovesWins Above ReplacementWAR Position PlayersOffensive WAR
1962 AL (OF)1952 AL  6.4 (4th)
1953 AL  5.8 (4th)
1954 AL  6.9 (4th)
1955 AL  9.5 (1st)
1956 AL  11.2 (1st)
1957 AL  11.3 (1st)
1958 AL  8.7 (1st)
1959 AL  6.6 (3rd)
1960 AL  6.4 (3rd)
1961 AL  10.4 (1st)
1962 AL  6.0 (4th)
Career  110.2 (21st)
1952 AL  6.4 (2nd)
1953 AL  5.8 (3rd)
1954 AL  6.9 (4th)
1955 AL  9.5 (1st)
1956 AL  11.2 (1st)
1957 AL  11.3 (1st)
1958 AL  8.7 (1st)
1959 AL  6.6 (1st)
1960 AL  6.4 (2nd)
1961 AL  10.4 (1st)
1962 AL  6.0 (2nd)
Career  110.2 (16th)
1952 AL  6.3 (2nd)
1953 AL  5.3 (3rd)
1954 AL  7.1 (2nd)
1955 AL  8.4 (1st)
1956 AL  10.6 (1st)
1957 AL  11.3 (1st)
1958 AL  9.3 (1st)
1959 AL  6.3 (1st)
1960 AL  6.7 (1st)
1961 AL  10.6 (1st)
1962 AL  7.6 (1st)
1964 AL  6.7 (1st)
1966 AL  4.7 (7th)
1967 AL  4.6 (9th)
Career  116.3 (12th)
Defensive WARBatting AverageOn-Base%Slugging %
1955 AL  1.1 (7th)1952 AL  .311 (3rd)
1955 AL  .306 (7th)
1956 AL  .353 (1st)
1957 AL  .365 (2nd)
1958 AL  .304 (7th)
1961 AL  .317 (4th)
1962 AL  .321 (2nd)
1964 AL  .303 (4th)
Career  .298 (240th)
1952 AL  .394 (4th)
1953 AL  .398 (7th)
1954 AL  .408 (3rd)
1955 AL  .431 (1st)
1956 AL  .464 (2nd)
1957 AL  .512 (2nd)
1958 AL  .443 (2nd)
1959 AL  .390 (6th)
1960 AL  .399 (4th)
1961 AL  .448 (2nd)
1962 AL  .486 (1st)
1964 AL  .423 (1st)
1967 AL  .391 (5th)
1968 AL  .385 (3rd)
Career  .421 (19th)
1952 AL  .530 (2nd)
1953 AL  .497 (6th)
1954 AL  .525 (3rd)
1955 AL  .611 (1st)
1956 AL  .705 (1st)
1957 AL  .665 (2nd)
1958 AL  .592 (3rd)
1959 AL  .514 (3rd)
1960 AL  .558 (2nd)
1961 AL  .687 (1st)
1962 AL  .605 (1st)
1964 AL  .591 (2nd)
Career  .557 (21st)
On-Base Plus SluggingGames PlayedPlate AppearancesRuns Scored
1952 AL  .924 (1st)
1953 AL  .895 (5th)
1954 AL  .933 (3rd)
1955 AL  1.042 (1st)
1956 AL  1.169 (1st)
1957 AL  1.177 (2nd)
1958 AL  1.035 (2nd)
1959 AL  .904 (2nd)
1960 AL  .957 (1st)
1961 AL  1.135 (2nd)
1962 AL  1.091 (1st)
1964 AL  1.015 (1st)
1967 AL  .825 (10th)
1968 AL  .782 (9th)
Career  .977 (14th)
1956 AL  150 (10th)
1958 AL  150 (7th)
1960 AL  153 (2nd)
Career  2,401 (89th)
1955 AL  638 (10th)
1956 AL  652 (9th)
1958 AL  654 (6th)
1959 AL  640 (10th)
1960 AL  644 (7th)
Career  9,910 (91st)
1952 AL  94 (6th)
1953 AL  105 (3rd)
1954 AL  129 (1st)
1955 AL  121 (2nd)
1956 AL  132 (1st)
1957 AL  121 (1st)
1958 AL  127 (1st)
1959 AL  104 (2nd)
1960 AL  119 (1st)
1961 AL  131 (2nd)
1962 AL  96 (7th)
1964 AL  92 (7th)
Career  1,676 (30th)
HitsTotal BasesDoublesTriples
1952 AL  171 (5th)
1954 AL  163 (8th)
1955 AL  158 (9th)
1956 AL  188 (4th)
1957 AL  173 (4th)
1958 AL  158 (10th)
1959 AL  154 (9th)
Career  2,415 (123rd)
1952 AL  291 (2nd)
1954 AL  285 (3rd)
1955 AL  316 (2nd)
1956 AL  376 (1st)
1957 AL  315 (2nd)
1958 AL  307 (1st)
1959 AL  278 (4th)
1960 AL  294 (1st)
1961 AL  353 (3rd)
1964 AL  275 (8th)
Career  4,511 (49th)
1952 AL  37 (2nd)
1957 AL  28 (7th)
1954 AL  12 (4th)
1955 AL  11 (1st)
1957 AL  6 (6th)
1960 AL  6 (8th)
Home RunsRuns Batted InBases on BallsStrikeouts
1952 AL  23 (7th)
1953 AL  21 (7th)
1954 AL  27 (3rd)
1955 AL  37 (1st)
1956 AL  52 (1st)
1957 AL  34 (3rd)
1958 AL  42 (1st)
1959 AL  31 (4th)
1960 AL  40 (1st)
1961 AL  54 (2nd)
1962 AL  30 (7th)
1964 AL  35 (3rd)
1967 AL  22 (8th)
Career  536 (18th)
1952 AL  87 (8th)
1953 AL  92 (10th)
1954 AL  102 (5th)
1955 AL  99 (6th)
1956 AL  130 (1st)
1957 AL  94 (6th)
1958 AL  97 (5th)
1960 AL  94 (6th)
1961 AL  128 (5th)
1964 AL  111 (3rd)
Career  1,509 (56th)
1952 AL  75 (7th)
1953 AL  79 (7th)
1954 AL  102 (3rd)
1955 AL  113 (1st)
1956 AL  112 (2nd)
1957 AL  146 (1st)
1958 AL  129 (1st)
1959 AL  93 (3rd)
1960 AL  111 (2nd)
1961 AL  126 (1st)
1962 AL  122 (1st)
1964 AL  99 (2nd)
1965 AL  73 (6th)
1967 AL  107 (2nd)
1968 AL  106 (2nd)
Career  1,733 (8th)
1951 AL  74 (3rd)
1952 AL  111 (1st)
1953 AL  90 (2nd)
1954 AL  107 (1st)
1955 AL  97 (3rd)
1956 AL  99 (3rd)
1958 AL  120 (1st)
1959 AL  126 (1st)
1960 AL  125 (1st)
1961 AL  112 (3rd)
1967 AL  113 (7th)
Career  1,710 (37th)
Stolen BasesAdjusted OPS+Runs CreatedAdj. Batting Runs
1953 AL  8 (8th)
1955 AL  8 (8th)
1956 AL  10 (7th)
1957 AL  16 (4th)
1958 AL  18 (4th)
1959 AL  21 (2nd)
1960 AL  14 (7th)
1952 AL  162 (2nd)
1953 AL  145 (5th)
1954 AL  158 (2nd)
1955 AL  180 (1st)
1956 AL  210 (1st)
1957 AL  221 (2nd)
1958 AL  188 (1st)
1959 AL  151 (1st)
1960 AL  162 (1st)
1961 AL  206 (1st)
1962 AL  195 (1st)
1964 AL  177 (1st)
1967 AL  150 (7th)
1968 AL  143 (8th)
Career  172 (10th)
1952 AL  115 (1st)
1953 AL  91 (10th)
1954 AL  126 (2nd)
1955 AL  148 (1st)
1956 AL  188 (1st)
1957 AL  178 (1st)
1958 AL  147 (1st)
1959 AL  117 (1st)
1960 AL  125 (1st)
1961 AL  174 (2nd)
1962 AL  126 (2nd)
1964 AL  121 (3rd)
Career  2,047 (18th)
1952 AL  46 (1st)
1953 AL  31 (5th)
1954 AL  45 (2nd)
1955 AL  61 (1st)
1956 AL  87 (1st)
1957 AL  92 (1st)
1958 AL  69 (1st)
1959 AL  40 (1st)
1960 AL  48 (1st)
1961 AL  81 (2nd)
1962 AL  60 (1st)
1963 AL  24 (10th)
1964 AL  53 (1st)
1966 AL  32 (5th)
1967 AL  34 (6th)
1968 AL  29 (7th)
Career  860 (9th)
Adj. Batting WinsExtra Base HitsTimes On BaseOffensive Win %
1952 AL  4.7 (1st)
1953 AL  3.1 (5th)
1954 AL  4.5 (2nd)
1955 AL  5.9 (1st)
1956 AL  8.1 (1st)
1957 AL  9.0 (1st)
1958 AL  6.9 (1st)
1959 AL  4.0 (1st)
1960 AL  4.8 (1st)
1961 AL  7.7 (2nd)
1962 AL  5.8 (1st)
1963 AL  2.5 (10th)
1964 AL  5.4 (1st)
1966 AL  3.3 (5th)
1967 AL  3.6 (6th)
1968 AL  3.3 (7th)
Career  85.2 (10th)
1952 AL  67 (1st)
1954 AL  56 (4th)
1955 AL  73 (1st)
1956 AL  79 (1st)
1957 AL  68 (2nd)
1958 AL  64 (4th)
1959 AL  58 (4th)
1960 AL  63 (2nd)
1961 AL  76 (3rd)
1964 AL  62 (6th)
Career  952 (53rd)
1952 AL  246 (7th)
1954 AL  265 (4th)
1955 AL  274 (4th)
1956 AL  302 (1st)
1957 AL  319 (1st)
1958 AL  289 (1st)
1959 AL  249 (4th)
1960 AL  257 (2nd)
1961 AL  289 (2nd)
1964 AL  240 (8th)
Career  4,161 (37th)
1952 AL  .770 (1st)
1953 AL  .715 (3rd)
1954 AL  .777 (2nd)
1955 AL  .826 (1st)
1956 AL  .879 (1st)
1957 AL  .909 (2nd)
1958 AL  .834 (1st)
1959 AL  .743 (4th)
1960 AL  .759 (1st)
1961 AL  .866 (2nd)
1962 AL  .871 (1st)
1964 AL  .817 (1st)
1967 AL  .727 (6th)
1968 AL  .710 (9th)
Career  .804 (9th)
Intentional Bases on BallsCaught StealingSB %Power-Speed #
1952 AL  10 (5th)
1954 AL  7 (10th)
1955 AL  6 (10th)
1957 AL  23 (2nd)
1958 AL  13 (1st)
1959 AL  6 (7th)
1960 AL  6 (8th)
1961 AL  9 (4th)
1962 AL  9 (6th)
1964 AL  18 (1st)
Career  148 (57th)
1951 AL  7 (7th)1957 AL  84.21 (2nd)
1958 AL  85.71 (2nd)
1959 AL  87.50 (1st)
1960 AL  82.35 (3rd)
Career  80.11 (66th)
1951 AL  9.9 (6th)
1953 AL  11.6 (5th)
1954 AL  8.4 (9th)
1955 AL  13.2 (4th)
1956 AL  16.8 (1st)
1957 AL  21.8 (1st)
1958 AL  25.2 (1st)
1959 AL  25.0 (1st)
1960 AL  20.7 (1st)
1961 AL  19.6 (2nd)
1962 AL  13.8 (6th)
Career  238.0 (63rd)
AB per HRBase-Out Runs Added (RE24)Win Probability Added (WPA)Situ. Wins Added (WPA/LI)
1952 AL  23.9 (10th)
1953 AL  22.0 (6th)
1954 AL  20.1 (4th)
1955 AL  14.0 (2nd)
1956 AL  10.3 (1st)
1957 AL  13.9 (3rd)
1958 AL  12.4 (2nd)
1959 AL  17.5 (5th)
1960 AL  13.2 (2nd)
1961 AL  9.5 (1st)
1962 AL  12.6 (2nd)
1964 AL  13.3 (3rd)
1967 AL  20.0 (7th)
1968 AL  24.2 (9th)
Career  15.1 (18th)
1951 AL  26.72 (8th)
1952 AL  44.77 (2nd)
1953 AL  47.55 (4th)
1954 AL  57.91 (3rd)
1955 AL  67.41 (1st)
1956 AL  99.65 (1st)
1957 AL  93.45 (1st)
1958 AL  67.85 (1st)
1959 AL  40.97 (5th)
1960 AL  56.18 (1st)
1961 AL  95.52 (1st)
1962 AL  79.17 (1st)
1964 AL  65.39 (1st)
1966 AL  31.65 (9th)
1967 AL  36.18 (5th)
1968 AL  33.67 (8th)
Career  977.63 (7th)
1952 AL  4.0 (3rd)
1953 AL  3.9 (7th)
1954 AL  5.5 (4th)
1955 AL  6.3 (2nd)
1956 AL  8.4 (1st)
1957 AL  9.3 (1st)
1958 AL  6.3 (3rd)
1959 AL  3.1 (10th)
1960 AL  6.0 (1st)
1961 AL  9.0 (1st)
1962 AL  8.0 (1st)
1963 AL  3.0 (8th)
1964 AL  6.5 (1st)
1967 AL  3.9 (5th)
1968 AL  4.4 (4th)
Career  94.2 (6th)
1952 AL  3.9 (2nd)
1953 AL  3.7 (5th)
1954 AL  5.3 (2nd)
1955 AL  7.5 (1st)
1956 AL  9.4 (1st)
1957 AL  9.9 (1st)
1958 AL  8.0 (1st)
1959 AL  3.7 (7th)
1960 AL  5.2 (1st)
1961 AL  8.8 (1st)
1962 AL  7.1 (1st)
1964 AL  6.2 (1st)
1966 AL  3.6 (6th)
1967 AL  4.3 (5th)
1968 AL  3.3 (8th)
Career  95.5 (6th)
Championship WPA (cWPA)Base-Out Wins Added (REW)PutoutsDef. Games as 1B
1951 AL  10.4 (2nd)
1952 AL  19.0 (2nd)
1953 AL  10.9 (1st)
1954 AL  16.9 (2nd)
1955 AL  22.1 (1st)
1956 AL  19.2 (1st)
1957 AL  25.2 (1st)
1958 AL  8.9 (1st)
1960 AL  22.4 (1st)
1961 AL  24.0 (1st)
1962 AL  22.4 (1st)
1963 AL  5.9 (3rd)
1964 AL  16.9 (3rd)
Career  232.4 (2nd)
1951 AL  2.7 (8th)
1952 AL  4.7 (3rd)
1953 AL  4.8 (4th)
1954 AL  5.8 (3rd)
1955 AL  6.5 (1st)
1956 AL  9.4 (1st)
1957 AL  9.2 (1st)
1958 AL  6.9 (1st)
1959 AL  4.2 (4th)
1960 AL  5.6 (1st)
1961 AL  9.3 (1st)
1962 AL  7.7 (1st)
1964 AL  6.5 (1st)
1966 AL  3.4 (9th)
1967 AL  4.0 (5th)
1968 AL  3.8 (7th)
Career  97.9 (6th)
1968 AL  1,195 (3rd)1967 AL  131 (5th)
1968 AL  131 (3rd)
Putouts as 1BAssists as 1BErrors Committed as 1BDouble Plays Turned as 1B
1968 AL  1,195 (3rd)1967 AL  91 (4th)
1968 AL  76 (4th)
1968 AL  15 (2nd)1968 AL  91 (3rd)
Errors Committed as LF (s.1901)Def. Games as CF (s.1901)Putouts as CF (s.1901)Assists as CF (s.1901)
1965 AL  6 (3rd)1954 AL  143 (4th)
1955 AL  145 (4th)
1956 AL  144 (2nd)
1957 AL  139 (2nd)
1958 AL  150 (1st)
1959 AL  142 (2nd)
1960 AL  150 (1st)
1961 AL  150 (2nd)
Career  1,742 (18th)
1954 AL  327 (5th)
1955 AL  371 (4th)
1956 AL  367 (3rd)
1957 AL  326 (3rd)
1958 AL  329 (3rd)
1959 AL  369 (2nd)
1960 AL  324 (5th)
1961 AL  348 (3rd)
Career  4,016 (28th)
1952 AL  14 (1st)
1954 AL  20 (1st)
1955 AL  11 (2nd)
1956 AL  10 (2nd)
1957 AL  6 (5th)
1959 AL  7 (5th)
1960 AL  8 (3rd)
1961 AL  6 (5th)
Career  104 (40th)
Errors Committed as CF (s.1901)Double Plays Turned as CF (s.1901)Errors Committed as RF (s.1901)Double Plays Turned as RF (s.1901)
1952 AL  10 (1st)
1953 AL  6 (3rd)
1954 AL  9 (1st)
1956 AL  4 (4th)
1957 AL  7 (1st)
1958 AL  8 (1st)
1961 AL  6 (2nd)
1962 AL  4 (4th)
1964 AL  5 (4th)
Career  67 (43rd)
1952 AL  4 (1st)
1953 AL  2 (5th)
1954 AL  5 (3rd)
1955 AL  2 (2nd)
1956 AL  3 (1st)
1957 AL  1 (5th)
1958 AL  2 (1st)
1959 AL  3 (2nd)
1960 AL  1 (3rd)
1962 AL  1 (4th)
Career  25 (43rd)
1951 AL  6 (1st)1951 AL  1 (4th)
Def. Games as OFPutouts as OFAssists as OFErrors Committed as OF
1952 AL  141 (5th)
1957 AL  139 (5th)
1958 AL  150 (2nd)
1960 AL  150 (2nd)
1961 AL  150 (5th)
Career  2,019 (55th)
1952 AL  347 (5th)
1955 AL  372 (4th)
1956 AL  370 (3rd)
1957 AL  324 (3rd)
1958 AL  331 (3rd)
1959 AL  366 (2nd)
1960 AL  326 (5th)
1961 AL  351 (5th)
Career  4,438 (49th)
1952 AL  15 (3rd)
1954 AL  20 (1st)
1952 AL  12 (1st)
1954 AL  9 (2nd)
1957 AL  7 (4th)
1958 AL  8 (2nd)
Double Plays Turned as OFRange Factor/9Inn as 1BRange Factor/Game as 1BFielding % as 1B
1952 AL  5 (1st)
1954 AL  5 (3rd)
1956 AL  3 (4th)
1959 AL  3 (5th)
1967 AL  9.98 (3rd)
1968 AL  10.52 (2nd)
1967 AL  9.01 (4th)
1968 AL  9.70 (2nd)
1967 AL  .993 (3rd)
Range Factor/9Inn as LF (s.1948)Range Factor/Game as LF (s.1901)Total Zone Runs as CF (s.1953)Range Factor/9Inn as CF (s.1948)
1965 AL  1.83 (5th)1965 AL  1.53 (5th)1953 AL  6 (3rd)
1955 AL  10 (2nd)
1956 AL  5 (3rd)
1959 AL  4 (4th)
1952 AL  2.75 (5th)
Range Factor/Game as CF (s.1901)Fielding % as CF (s.1901)Total Zone Runs as OF (s.1953)Range Factor/9Inn as OF
1952 AL  2.70 (5th)
1953 AL  2.79 (5th)
1955 AL  2.63 (4th)
1956 AL  2.62 (4th)
1959 AL  2.65 (3rd)
1955 AL  .995 (1st)
1956 AL  .990 (2nd)
1957 AL  .979 (5th)
1959 AL  .995 (1st)
1960 AL  .991 (2nd)
1955 AL  10 (5th)1959 AL  2.67 (5th)
Range Factor/Game as OFFielding % as OFOldestYoungest
1952 AL  2.57 (5th)
1953 AL  2.74 (5th)
1955 AL  2.64 (4th)
1956 AL  2.64 (3rd)
1959 AL  2.61 (3rd)
1960 AL  2.23 (5th)
1955 AL  .995 (2nd)
1956 AL  .990 (2nd)
1959 AL  .995 (1st)
1960 AL  .991 (4th)
1968 AL  born 1931-10-20 (8th)1951 AL  born 1931-10-20 (1st)
1952 AL  born 1931-10-20 (8th)
1953 AL  born 1931-10-20 (8th)

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