Babe Ruth: The immortal legend of American baseball

Babe Ruth on his last day at Yankee Stadium.
Esteban Quiñones
Thursday December 1, 2022

Table of Contents

PositionOutfielder and Pitcher
Active years1914-1935
MLB Teams (years) Boston Red Sox (1914–1919)
 New York Yankees (1920–1934)
 Boston Braves (1935)
DebutJuly 11, 1914 (Age 19 vs. Cleveland Naps)
Last gameMay 30, 1935 (Age 40 vs. Philadelphia Phillies)
Date of BirthFebruary 6, 1895
Native placeBaltimore, MD
BattedLeft
ThrewLeft
All-Star×2 (1933, 1934)
World Champions×7 (1915, 1916, 1918, 1923, 1927, 1928, 1932)
AL MVP×1 (1923)
Number retiredNew York Yankees No. 3
Hall of Fame year1936 (215/226 BBWAA votes)
MLB AwardsAL batting champion (1924)
12× AL home run leader (1918–1921, 1923, 1924, 1926–1931)
5× AL RBI leader (1919–1921, 1923, 1926)
AL ERA leader (1916)
Monument Park honoree
Major League Baseball All-Century Team
Major League Baseball All-Time Team
LegacyBaseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York
Presidential Medal of Freedom
Monument Park Tribute of Babe Ruth
Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum, Baltimore
Ruthian word
USPS stamp
NicknameBabe, The Bambino, The Sultan Of Swat, Jidge, The Colossus of Clout, The King of Crash

Babe Ruth Bio

George Herman, famously called Babe Ruth, was the world’s first baseball superstar and one of the most famous athletes of our time. Nicknamed “the Bambino” and “the Sultan of Swat,” for his hitting exploits, he started his MLB career as a star left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but soon became most famous as a power-hitter for the New York Yankees and in baseball history. Ruth is seen as one of the most important sports figures in American culture, and many people think he was the best baseball player ever. Babe Ruth baseball cards remain a hot property in the sports memorabilia market and command big money.

Babe Ruth was one of the “first five” people to get into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936. From 1914 to 1935, he played in Major League Baseball (MLB) and rewrote the American sports history. His amazing hitting put curtains down on the Deadball Era and start a new era of long-distance hitting and high scoring. Ruth is still a big part of American culture because he was the first baseball player to get a lot of love from the public.

Babe Ruth was born on February 6, 1895, at 216 Emory Street in Baltimore, Maryland. The little boy spent his days unsupervised on the waterfront streets and docks, stealing and breaking things. This was because his father George Ruth worked long hours in a saloon and his mother Catherine Schamberger was often sick. He stole money from the cash register, drank the last drops of beer from old glasses, and started chewing tobacco when he hung out at his father’s bar. Babe Ruth had just turned six then.

Shortly after Little George turned seven, he ended up at St. Mary’s Industrial School, an orphanage and reform school on the edge of the city. The first time the boy stayed at St. Mary’s, he was only there for four weeks before his parents brought him home for the first of many attempts to get him to change. But after a violent fight at his father’s bar, city officials decided that this was not a good place for a small child to be. On June 13, 1902, Babe Ruth started at St. Mary’s. He was labeled “incorrigible,” and he spent most of the next 12 years there. This was reflected in his life as a superstar player and there are many stories about brashness in his sexual life.

Most of the boys at St. Mary’s played baseball in leagues, even though they were not all good at it. Babe Ruth steadily moved up the ladder of success and played about 200 games a year. Even though he played every position at some point, he was best known as a pitcher. One day, Ruth was standing off to the side laughing at how badly other students were pitching. Brother Matthias told him to go in and see if he could do better. Babe Ruth accepted the challenge and had become the best pitcher at St. Mary’s. When he turned 18 in 1913, he was allowed to leave the school to play for community teams on the weekends. His prodigy attracted attention and admiration, which was talked about in several newspaper articles, both for how well he pitched and how far his home runs went.

Babe Ruth- early baseball career

Early in 1914, Babe Ruth signed a contract to play baseball professionally with Jack Dunn. Dunn was the owner and manager of the Baltimore Orioles, a team in the International League. Ruth’s first game as a professional baseball player was on March 7, 1914. It was an inter-squad game. During a 15–9 win, he played shortstop and pitched the last two innings. Babe Ruth hit a long home run to right field in his second turn at bat. The blast was said to be longer than a famous shot made by Jim Thorpe in Fayetteville.

He played his first organized baseball game against the Philadelphia Athletics, who had won three of the last four World Series, in an exhibition game. Babe Ruth pitched the middle three innings. In the fourth, he gave up two runs, but then he calmed down and pitched two innings without any runs. The next day, Ruth came into a game against the Phillies in the sixth inning and didn’t let any runs score for the rest of the game. In the bottom of the eighth inning, the Orioles scored seven runs to come back from being down 6–0. Ruth was the winning pitcher. Dunn sold Babe Ruth to the Boston Red Sox that summer because he needed money.

On July 11, 1914, less than five months after he left St. Mary’s, Babe Ruth played his first game at Fenway Park. He pitched against Cleveland for seven innings, and his team won 4-3. After getting hit hard in his second game by Detroit, Ruth sat on the bench until mid-August, when he was sent to the minor leagues, where he helped the Providence Grays win the International League pennant. For the last week of the 1914 season, Babe Ruth went back to Boston. On October 2, he beat the Yankees by pitching a complete game and hitting a double for his first hit in the major leagues.

In 1916, Babe Ruth won 23 games and had a league-best 1.75 earned run average (ERA). He also had nine shutouts, which remains an AL record for left-handed pitchers. Ron Guidry of the Yankees equaled it in 1978. In Game 2 of the World Series, Babe Ruth pitched all 14 innings and beat the Brooklyn Dodgers 2-1. Boston beat Brooklyn in the series by four games to one. Ruth didn’t bat much in 1917, other than when he was pitching. He hit .325 with two home runs.

But the Red Sox saw Ruth’s ability at the plate and started moving him to the outfield. In 1918, the Red Sox won their fourth World Series in seven years, and Ruth was there for three of them. He led the American League with 11 home runs and went 13-7 as a pitcher. Then, in 1919, Babe Ruth set a new single-season record with 29 home runs and 113 RBI. He went 9-5 as a pitcher in his last year when he made more than two starts.

On May 6, 1918, when the Yankees played at the Polo Grounds, Ruth played first base and batted sixth. It was the first time he played in a game other than as a pitcher or a pinch-hitter, and it was also the first time he hit in a spot other than ninth. Babe Ruth went 2-for-4 and hit a two-run home run. At that point, five of Ruth’s 11 career home runs had happened in New York. The Boston Post’s Paul Shannon started his game story by saying, “Babe Ruth is still the hitting idol of the Polo Grounds.”

The next day, against the Senators, Babe Ruth was moved up to the fourth spot in the lineup, where he stayed for most of the season and hit another home run. Ruth hit.469 (15-for-32) and slugged.969 with four singles, six doubles, and five triples in 10 games at Fenway. He was very good at first base, which was his favorite spot. In his last ten starts, he never let more than two runs score on him. Babe, who was known as “The Colossus” in Boston, kept his status as a top pitcher while also becoming the best hitter in the game.

Babe Ruth starts his Yankees career

In 1919, there were more people at games than ever before, and Ruth’s home runs for Boston made him a national star. But on December 26, 1919, the Boston Red Sox sold Babe Ruth’s contract to the New York Yankees because they didn’t like how he behaved or followed rules. With Ruth, the Yankees were taking a chance. He would be laughed at for what he said, but at the time, the Yankees agreed with him. The amount paid was huge ($100,000), Ruth ate and drank too much, went to prostitutes often, and had been in several car accidents. But during his 15 years in New York, “The Sultan of Swat” led a powerful and well-known team to seven American League pennants and four World Series titles. Twelve times, Babe Ruth led the AL in home runs. In 1927, he set a record with 60 home runs, which stood for 34 years.

In 1920, the Babe had a slow start. After a bad April in which he missed time because of a sore right knee, Babe Ruth started May by hitting home runs in two straight games against the Red Sox. He went on to hit 11 home runs in one month, which was a major league record. When he hit 13 long balls in June, that record only stood for 30 days. On July 16, he tied his own single-season record of 29 home runs, which he set the year before with Boston. Two weeks later, he had 37.

He hit an unbelievable 54 home runs by the end of the year. He hit more home runs than 14 of the 15 other big league teams. George Sisler was second in the American League with 19. Cy Williams won the National League with just 15. Babe Ruth hit 14.6% of the 369 home runs in the American League. Barry Bonds would have had to hit 431 home runs in 2001 to beat Babe Ruth of 1920. Ruth also had a batting average of .376 and was fourth in the league in terms of power. His slugging percentage of.847 stood for more than 80 years until Bonds hit .863 in 2001.

When he moved to New York, he started a run of offensive dominance that the game is unlikely to see again. Babe Ruth led the AL in slugging 11 times, home runs 10 times, walks 9 times, on-base percentage 8 times, and runs scored 7 times in the 12 years between 1920 and 1931. Eight times, his average was better than .350. In six of those 12 seasons, he hit better than .370.

Babe Ruth hit home runs early and often in 1921. He broke Roger Connor’s record of 138 home runs in a career during that season. Ruth broke his own record with each of the almost 600 home runs he hit after that. After a slow start, the Yankees and Cleveland, who won the 1920 World Series, were soon in a tight race for the pennant. Babe Ruth hit his 55th home run on September 15, breaking the record he had held for a single season for a year. In late September, the Yankees went to Cleveland and won three of the four games they played there. This gave them the lead in the race, and a few days later they won their first pennant. Ruth hit .378 and had a slugging percentage of.846 for the regular season. He hit 59 home runs. Ruth’s 177 runs scored, 119 extra-base hits, and 457 total bases set records for the modern era that still stand as of 2022. But the Giants beat them to the title in 1921.

Babe Ruth signed a new contract on March 4, 1922, for three years at $52,000 a year. This was more than twice as much as the most any baseball player had ever been paid up to that point, and it was 40% of the team’s player pay. Before the 1922 season, Ruth became the Yankees’ new captain on the field. He played in 110 games and hit .315 with 35 home runs and 99 runs driven in. The Yankees lost to the Giants in the World Series for the second year in a row. In 17 at-bats, Ruth only got two hits.

Babe Ruth makes Yankee Stadium his own

Yankee Stadium was finished in time for the home opener on April 18, 1923. Babe Ruth hit the first home run in what quickly became known as “the House that Ruth Built.” The superstar hitter was in mind when the ballpark was built. In 1923, Ruth hit 41 homers making him the joint-topper in the league with Cy Williams. His .393 average made the Yankees dominate all and took the pennant with a margin of 17 games. He scripted an MLB record with 379 stolen bases. For the third year in a row, Ruth led the Yankees to victory over the Giants in the World Series. During the series, he hit .368, walked eight times, scored eight runs, hit three home runs, and had a 1.000 slugging percentage. This helped the Yankees win their first World Series title, 4 games to 2, and open their new stadium with a bang.

Nearly every day in the 1920s, sportswriters came up with new nicknames for Babe Ruth. His nickname in Boston, “the Colossus,” turned into “the Wizard of Wham,” “the Sultan of Swat,” “the Prince of Pounders,” and so on. His last name, “Ruthian,” is now an adjective that means “huge, dramatic, prodigious, magnificent, and full of power.”

Ruth’s best batting average was .378 in 1924, which was almost 20 points better than Charlie Jamieson’s .359. This was the only batting title he ever won. Babe Ruth hit 46 home runs and had 124 RBIs, which tied for second place. His slugging percentage of .739 was more than 200 points higher than that of Harry Heilmann and Ken Williams, who tied for second place (both at .533). But in the end, the Yankees were two games behind the Washington Senators and came in second place. But in 1925, the Yankees fell all the way to seventh place, and rumors spread that Babe Ruth had died during the offseason. This led British newspapers to print an obituary for him before he had even died.

Babe Ruth came back strong in 1926, when he hit .372 with 47 home runs and 146 runs batted in. From 1926 to 1928, he was in charge of the Murderers’ Row. Ruth hit three home runs in Game Four of the 1926 World Series against the Cardinals. This was the first time that had happened in a World Series game, and it helped the Yankees win. Babe Ruth caught a ball as he crashed into the fence during the fifth game. Baseball writers said that the play was a gem of defense.

Babe Ruth made a promise to an 11-year-old boy who was in the hospital during the 1926 World Series. Ruth told the little boy that he would hit a home run for him. Sylvester had hurt himself when he fell off a horse. His father’s friend gave the boy two signed baseballs from the Yankees and the Cardinals. Babe Ruth, who didn’t know the boy, told the friend that he would hit a home run for him. Ruth went to see the boy in the hospital after the Series.

People think that the 1927 New York Yankees team was one of the best teams to ever play baseball. It is called “Murderers’ Row” because the people who live there are so strong. Appel wrote, “The New York Yankees of 1927. Even now, the words make people feel awe, and every baseball team’s success is measured against the ’27 team.” Babe Ruth and his teammate Lou Gehrig bet on who could hit the ball the farthest. On September 30, he broke it with his 60th home run, which came off Tom Zachary in the eighth inning and broke a tie of 2–2. “Sixty! Let some son of a b*tch try to do better than that “Ruth was very happy after the game.

The Yankees beat the Pittsburgh Pirates in four games in the 1927 World Series. Babe Ruth’s play in 1928 was similar to how his team did that year. He got off to a great start and had 42 home runs by August 1. This put him ahead of his pace from the last year when he hit 60 home runs. He then went into a slump for the rest of the season. In the last two months, he only hit 12 home runs. Ruth’s batting average dropped to .323, which is much lower than his average for his whole career. Babe Ruth still hit 54 home runs by the end of the season. In the World Series, the Yankees swept the Cardinals in four games. In Game Four, Ruth hit .625 and hit three home runs.

Before the 1929 season, the Yankees wore uniform numbers so that fans at Yankee Stadium, which was very big, could easily tell who was who. Babe Ruth was up third and his number was 3. He tried to get the job of player-manager, but the owners never took him seriously for the job. Even though Ruth did well, the Yankees couldn’t catch up to the Athletics. On January 7, 1930, the Yankees and Ruth couldn’t quickly agree on a salary. Ruth had just finished a three-year contract that paid him $70,000 a year, so he quickly turned down the Yankees’ first offer of $70,000 for one year and their “final” offer of $75 for two years, which was the same as the annual salary of US President Herbert Hoover at the time. Instead, he asked for at least $85,000 and three years. After exactly two months, a deal was made, and Ruth agreed to settle for two years at an unheard-of $80,000 per year.

Babe Ruth calls his own shot

Babe Ruth had his best year after 1928 in 1930. He hit .359, hit 49 home runs, and drove in 153 runs. He also won his first game as a pitcher in nine years. Ruth, on the other hand, hit .373 with 46 home runs and 163 RBIs the next year. He had the most doubles since 1924, with 31. But in these two years, the Yankees couldn’t win any titles. The Yankees went 107–47 in 1932 and won the pennant. Babe Ruth was not as good as he used to be, but he still hit .341, had 41 home runs, and drove in 137 runs. In the 1932 World Series in Chicago, people laughed at Ruth by throwing lemons at him, and some people (including the Cubs) yelled insults at Ruth and other Yankees. They were quiet for a moment when he hit a three-run home run off Charlie Root in the first inning, but they soon got going again. In the fourth inning, Babe Ruth made a mistake in the outfield that helped the Cubs tie the score at 4–4. When Ruth stepped up to bat in the top of the fifth, the crowd and players from Chicago, led by pitcher Guy Bush, yelled insults at him. At two balls and one strike, Babe Ruth made a motion, possibly toward center field. After the next pitch, which was a strike, he may have pointed there with one hand. He hit the fifth pitch over the center field fence. It may have gone nearly 500 feet, according to estimates (150 m).

Babe Ruth’s twilight years

Babe Ruth kept making things happen in 1933. He hit .301 and had 34 home runs, 103 RBIs, and 114 walks, which was the most in the league. He hit the first home run in the history of the All-Star Game. It was a two-run shot against Bill Hallahan in the third inning, which helped the AL win the game 4–2. As a publicity stunt, Ruth’s team called on him to pitch a complete game win against the Red Sox in the last game of the 1933 season. This was his last game as a pitcher. Even though Ruth’s pitching stats were nothing special, he was 5–0 in five games for the Yankees, bringing his career record to 94–46.

Ruth’s last full season with the Yankees was 1934. Even though Ruppert cut his pay to $35,000, he was still the best-paid player in the major leagues. He was still good with a bat. He had a batting average of .288 and hit 22 home runs. Just before the 1934 season, Ruppert offered to make Babe Ruth the manager of the Yankees’ best minor-league team, the Newark Bears, but the superstar turned it down. He knew that his time as a player was almost over. He wanted to be a manager in baseball. People often talked about him as a possible candidate for managerial jobs, but when the Red Sox job opened up in 1932, Ruth said he wasn’t ready to leave the field yet.

At the beginning of the 1934 season, Babe Ruth made it clear that he wanted to be the Yankees’ manager. But the job with the Yankees was never a real possibility. During the offseason between 1934 and 1935, Ruth and his wife went on a trip around the world. At the same time, the Yankees started talking with Judge Emil Fuchs, the owner of the Boston Braves, who wanted Ruth as a draw. On February 26, 1935, the Yankees gave Babe Ruth to the Braves in a trade and he played in Boston for the first time at home in more than 16 years. Ruth drove in all four runs for the Braves as they beat the New York Giants 4–2. He did this by hitting a two-run home run, a single that drove in a third run, and a run himself later in the inning. There were over 25,000 people at the game, including five of New England’s six governors. Even though he was slowing down because of his age and weight, he made a running catch in left field that sportswriters said was the best defensive play of the game.

Babe Ruth played in the third game of the Pittsburgh series on May 25, 1935, adding another story to his playing legend. Even though Ruth went 4-for-4 and hit three home runs, the Braves lost the game 11–7. Ruth’s old rival on the Cubs, Guy Bush, threw the last two. The last home run of the game and of his career went over the right field upper deck and out of Forbes Field. It was the first time anyone hit a fair ball all the way out of Forbes Field. Babe Ruth was told that this game should be his last, but he had already promised Fuchs that he would play in Cincinnati and Philadelphia. The Braves lost both games of a doubleheader in Philadelphia, and that was his last game in the major leagues. After a fight with Fuchs on June 2, Babe Ruth quit his job. In 1935, he had a batting average of .181, which was by far his worst as a full-time position player, and he hit the last six of his 714 home runs.

Babe Ruth retires

Babe Ruth left the big leagues after 22 years and 714 home runs. He played for the Boston Braves for part of the 1935 season and then retired. He also had 2,873 hits, 506 doubles, 2,174 runs, 2,214 RBI, a batting average of .342, an on-base percentage of .474, and a slugging percentage of .690 over the course of his career.

Babe Ruth also led the league 13 times in slugging percentage, 11 times in bases on balls, 10 times in on-base percentage, eight times in runs scored, and five times in runs batted in. Ruth was one of the first five people to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. He once said, “The fans would rather see me hit one home run to right than three doubles to left.”

On July 4, 1939, Babe Ruth gave a speech at Yankee Stadium for Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day. The 1927 Yankees and a sold-out crowd were there to honor the first baseman, who had to retire early because of ALS, which killed him two years later. Ruth went to Cooperstown, New York, the following week for the official opening of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Three years earlier, he was one of the first five players to be inducted into the hall.

Babe Ruth went to New York’s French Hospital for tests in November 1946. These tests showed that he had a cancerous tumor at the base of his skull and in his neck that was too big to remove. The problem was a growth called nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which is also called “lymphoepithelioma.” On August 16, 1948, Ruth died.

Babe Ruth’s Greatest Moments

Glenn Stout, the author of History of the Yankees, writes “Ruth was New York incarnate—uncouth and raw, flamboyant and flashy, oversized, out of scale, and absolutely unstoppable”. He was a symbol of American pride in his lifetime. During World War II Japanese soldiers often yelled in English, “To hell with Babe Ruth”, to anger American soldiers. Thomas Barthel called “one of the first celebrity athletes.” Babe Ruth won the Baseball’s Greatest Player Ever in a vote on the eve of the 100th anniversary of professional baseball in 1969. In 1993, the Associated Press put him alongside Muhammad Ali “as the most recognized athlete in America.” He came second after Michael Jordan in 1999 in a poll to rank the greatest U.S. athlete of the century.

  • 2-time AL All-Star (1933 & 1934)
  • AL MVP (1923)
  • AL ERA Leader (1916)
  • AL Complete Games Leader (1917)
  • AL Shutouts Leader (1916)
  • AL Batting Average Leader (1924)
  • 10-time AL On-Base Percentage Leader (1919-1921, 1923-1927 & 1930-1932)
  • 13-time AL Slugging Percentage Leader (1918-1924 & 1926-1931)
  • 13-time AL OPS Leader (1918-1924 & 1926-1931)
  • 8-time AL Runs Scored Leader (1918-1924 & 1926-1928)
  • 6-time AL Total Bases Leader (1919, 1921, 1923, 1924, 1926 & 1928)
  • 12-time AL Home Runs Leader (1918-1921, 1923, 1924 & 1926-1931)
  • 5-time AL RBI Leader (1919-1921, 1923 & 1926)
  • 11-time AL Bases on Balls Leader (1920, 1921, 1923, 1924, 1926-1928 & 1930-1933)
  • 15 Wins Seasons: 3 (1915-1917)
  • 20 Wins Seasons: 2 (1916 & 1917)
  • 200 Innings Pitched Seasons: 3 (1915-1917)
  • 300 Innings Pitched Seasons: 2 (1916-1917)
  • 20-Home Run Seasons: 16 (1919-1934)
  • 30-Home Run Seasons: 13 (1920-1924 & 1926-1933)
  • 40-Home Run Seasons: 11 (1920, 1921, 1923, 1924 & 1926-1932)
  • 50-Home Run Seasons: 4 (1920, 1921, 1927 & 1928)
  • 60-Home Run Seasons: 1 (1927)
  • 100 RBI Seasons: 13 (1919-1921, 1923, 1924 & 1926-1933)
  • 100 Runs Scored Seasons: 12 (1919-1921, 1923, 1924 & 1926-1932)
  • 200 Hits Seasons: 3 (1921, 1923 & 1924)
  • Won seven World Series with the Boston Red Sox (1915, 1916 & 1918) and the New York Yankees (1923, 1927, 1928 & 1932)
  • Baseball Hall of Fame: Class of 1936

FAQs about Babe Ruth

How did Babe Ruth die?

He died of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal cancer.

Who wrote Who was Babe Ruth book?

Joan Holub

How many at bats did Babe Ruth have?

8,399

Why was Babe Ruth called the great bambino?

Babe Ruth was called Bambino, which means baby in Italian, a translation of his first nickname.

How much is a gold Babe Ruth card worth?

The average value of “babe Ruth gold baseball card” is $8.47. Sold comparables range in price from a low of $0.99 to a high of $200.00.

What did baseball legend Babe Ruth keep on his head, under his baseball cap?

The Babe Wore a Piece of Cabbage under his hat to keep cool.

How tall was Babe Ruth?

1.88 m

What vegetable did Babe Ruth use to keep cool?

Cabbage leaves

How much is a Babe Ruth signed baseball worth?

$10,000 or more

Where is Babe Ruth buried?

Gate Of Heaven, New York, United States

How much is Babe Ruth worth?

Between $6 and $9 million in 2021 currency

How much is a Babe Ruth autograph worth?

Babe Ruth’s signed baseballs fetched between $25,000 –$50,000 per piece.

How many signed Babe Ruth balls exist?

5,000 baseballs

How hard did Babe Ruth throw?

An average speed of 97 mph

Why is April 27 Babe Ruth day?

In 1947, April 27 was declared Babe Ruth Day.

How much are Babe Ruth cards worth?

The average price is $2.13.

How much is a Babe Ruth-signed baseball card worth?

$3,000 – up.

How did Babe Ruth get his nickname?

While in Fayetteville, the players learned that Dunn had legally adopted Ruth to keep him with the Orioles. Also, Ruth loved to play playing on the elevators at the Lafayette Hotel. This led the older players to tease him as “Dunn’s baby,” later shortened to “Baby” and “Babe.”

What race was Babe Ruth?

Americans of German ancestry

What size bat did Babe Ruth use?

36-inch

What pitches did Babe Ruth throw?

Fastball, curveball, and even a knuckleball.

How many kids did Babe Ruth have?

2

How much is Babe Ruth’s rookie card worth?

$612,000

What number was Babe Ruth?

3

How many times did Babe Ruth strike out?

488

Where did Babe Ruth die?

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States

How old was Babe Ruth when he died?

53 years

When did Babe Ruth retire?

June 2, 1935

How old would Babe Ruth be today?

Ruth would be 127 years in 2022 if he was alive today

How many teams did Babe Ruth play for?

Boston Red Sox (1914–1919), New York Yankees (1920–1934), and Boston Braves (1935)

Who played Babe Ruth in the sandlot?

Art LaFleur

How many home runs did Babe Ruth hit?

714

Why was Babe Ruth famous?

Although best remembered for swatting a prodigious 714 home runs and slugging .690, which remains a record.

What position did Babe Ruth play?

Pitcher, outfielder

How many hits did Babe Ruth have?

2,873 hits

When did Babe Ruth play baseball?

1914

When was Babe Ruth born?

February 6, 1895

How many years did Babe Ruth play baseball?

22-year

How many rings does Babe Ruth have?

7

What years did Babe Ruth play baseball?

1914 through 1935

Who was Babe Ruth?

Babe Ruth was an American professional baseball player

How many world series did Babe Ruth win?

7

The Stats

SUMMARYWARABHHRBARRBISBOBPSLGOPSOPS+
Career183.183992873714.34221742214123.474.6901.164206

Babe Ruth’s Standard Batting Record

YearGPAABRH2B3BHRRBISBCSBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSOPS+TBGDPHBPSHSFIBBPos
1914510101210000004.200.200.300.50050300/1H
19154210392162910142000923.315.376.576.95218953021H
19166715213618375331601023.272.322.419.74112257041H
19175214212314406321401218.325.385.472.85716258071H
19189538231750952611116165858.300.411.555.966192176237138/H
1919130543432103139341229113710158.322.456.6571.11421728463*71/38H
192014261745815817236954135141415080.376.532.8471.37925538835*978/31H
1921152693540177204441659168171314581.378.512.8461.35923945744*78/31H
1922110496406941282483596258480.315.434.6721.10618227314*79/3
1923152699522151205451341130172117093.393.545.7641.30923939943*97/83
19241536815291432003974612491314281.378.513.7391.25222039146*97/8H
192598426359611041222567245968.290.393.543.9361371952697
19261526524951391843054715311914476.372.516.7371.253226365310*79/H3
1927151691540158192298601657613789.356.486.7721.258225417014*97
1928154684536163173298541464513787.323.463.7091.172206380388*97
192913558749912117226646154537260.345.430.6971.1281933483135*97/H
193014567651815018628949153101013661.359.493.7321.2252113791218*97/1
1931145663534149199313461625412851.373.495.7001.195218374105*97/H3
1932133589457120156135411372213062.341.489.6611.150201302204*97/H3
193313757645997138213341044511490.301.442.5821.023176267203*97/H31
19341254723657810517422841310463.288.448.537.985160196201*97H
1935289272131300612002024.181.359.431.7891193120007/9H
22 Yrs250310626839921742873506136714221412311720621330.342.474.6901.1642065793243113 34 
162 Game Avg.162688544141186339461438 13386.342.474.6901.164206375 37   
 GPAABRH2B3BHRRBISBCSBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSOPS+TBGDPHBPSHSFIBBPos
NYY (15 yrs)20849202721719592518424106659197811011718521122.349.484.7111.1952095131 3594 34 
BOS (6 yrs)39113321110202342823049224130190184.308.413.568.981190631 819   
BSN (1 yr)289272131300612002024.181.359.431.78911931200 0 
AL (21 yrs)247510534832721612860506136708220212311720421306.343.475.6921.1672075762 43113 34 
NL (1 yr)289272131300612002024.181.359.431.78911931200 0 

Babe Ruth’s Postseason Batting Record

YearGPAABRH2B3BHRRBISBCSBBSOBAOBPSLGOPSTBGDPHBPSHSFIBBWPAcWPA
1915111000000000.000.000.000.0000000-0.04-1.2%
1916155000001002.000.000.000.0000000-0.19-5.6%
1918365010102002.200.200.600.80030100.206.5%
1921621163500142158.313.476.500.97680000.08-0.2%
1922521171210010123.118.250.176.4263110-0.20-4.2%
1923627198711330086.368.5561.0001.556190000.167.0%
19267312066004511112.300.548.9001.448180010.3722.8%
1927418154600271022.400.471.8001.271120010.182.1%
19284171691030340012.625.6471.3752.022220000.427.3%
1932420156500260043.333.500.7331.233111000.228.3%
10 Yrs (10 Series)411671293742521533433330.326.470.7441.21496 22 21.1842.8%
10 WS411671293742521533433330.326.470.7441.21496 22 21.1842.8%

Babe Ruth’s Career Graph

Hall of FameAll-Star GamesAwardsMVP (rank, share)
1936 BBWAA (95.1%) Selected to HOF in 1936 by BBWAA1933 (RF)
1934 (RF)
1916 AL Pitching Title
1923 AL MVP
1924 AL Batting Title
1923 AL (1, 100%)
1931 AL (5, 50%)
1932 AL (6, 33%)
1 MVP
1.83 Career Shares (129th)
Wins Above ReplacementWAR Position PlayersOffensive WARDefensive WAR
1916 AL  10.4 (2nd)
1917 AL  8.6 (4th)
1918 AL  7.0 (4th)
1919 AL  9.9 (2nd)
1920 AL  11.7 (1st)
1921 AL  12.6 (1st)
1922 AL  6.4 (9th)
1923 AL  14.2 (1st)
1924 AL  11.8 (1st)
1926 AL  11.6 (1st)
1927 AL  12.6 (1st)
1928 AL  10.2 (1st)
1929 AL  8.1 (1st)
1930 AL  10.5 (1st)
1931 AL  10.5 (1st)
1932 AL  8.5 (3rd)
1933 AL  6.3 (7th)
Career  183.1 (1st)
1918 AL  4.7 (7th)
1919 AL  9.1 (1st)
1920 AL  11.9 (1st)
1921 AL  12.9 (1st)
1922 AL  6.4 (5th)
1923 AL  14.2 (1st)
1924 AL  11.8 (1st)
1926 AL  11.6 (1st)
1927 AL  12.6 (1st)
1928 AL  10.2 (1st)
1929 AL  8.1 (1st)
1930 AL  10.3 (1st)
1931 AL  10.5 (1st)
1932 AL  8.5 (2nd)
1933 AL  6.3 (5th)
1934 AL  5.0 (9th)
Career  162.7 (2nd)
1918 AL  4.6 (7th)
1919 AL  8.3 (1st)
1920 AL  11.8 (1st)
1921 AL  12.2 (1st)
1922 AL  5.9 (6th)
1923 AL  12.3 (1st)
1924 AL  10.8 (1st)
1926 AL  11.1 (1st)
1927 AL  11.4 (2nd)
1928 AL  9.9 (1st)
1929 AL  7.9 (1st)
1930 AL  10.0 (1st)
1931 AL  10.7 (1st)
1932 AL  8.5 (3rd)
1933 AL  6.3 (4th)
Career  155.0 (1st)
1923 AL  1.2 (10th)
Batting AverageOn-Base%Slugging %On-Base Plus Slugging
1918 AL  .300 (8th)
1919 AL  .322 (8th)
1920 AL  .376 (4th)
1921 AL  .378 (3rd)
1923 AL  .393 (2nd)
1924 AL  .378 (1st)
1926 AL  .372 (2nd)
1927 AL  .356 (7th)
1929 AL  .345 (8th)
1930 AL  .359 (3rd)
1931 AL  .373 (2nd)
1932 AL  .341 (5th)
Career  .342 (13th)
1918 AL  .411 (2nd)
1919 AL  .456 (1st)
1920 AL  .532 (1st)
1921 AL  .512 (1st)
1922 AL  .434 (4th)
1923 AL  .545 (1st)
1924 AL  .513 (1st)
1926 AL  .516 (1st)
1927 AL  .486 (1st)
1928 AL  .463 (2nd)
1929 AL  .430 (3rd)
1930 AL  .493 (1st)
1931 AL  .495 (1st)
1932 AL  .489 (1st)
1933 AL  .442 (4th)
1934 AL  .448 (4th)
Career  .474 (2nd)
1918 AL  .555 (1st)
1919 AL  .657 (1st)
1920 AL  .847 (1st)
1921 AL  .846 (1st)
1922 AL  .672 (1st)
1923 AL  .764 (1st)
1924 AL  .739 (1st)
1926 AL  .737 (1st)
1927 AL  .772 (1st)
1928 AL  .709 (1st)
1929 AL  .697 (1st)
1930 AL  .732 (1st)
1931 AL  .700 (1st)
1932 AL  .661 (2nd)
1933 AL  .582 (3rd)
1934 AL  .537 (8th)
Career  .690 (1st)
1918 AL  .966 (1st)
1919 AL  1.114 (1st)
1920 AL  1.379 (1st)
1921 AL  1.359 (1st)
1922 AL  1.106 (1st)
1923 AL  1.309 (1st)
1924 AL  1.252 (1st)
1926 AL  1.253 (1st)
1927 AL  1.258 (1st)
1928 AL  1.172 (1st)
1929 AL  1.128 (1st)
1930 AL  1.225 (1st)
1931 AL  1.195 (1st)
1932 AL  1.150 (2nd)
1933 AL  1.023 (3rd)
1934 AL  .985 (5th)
Career  1.164 (1st)
Games PlayedPlate AppearancesRuns ScoredHits
1923 AL  152 (7th)
1924 AL  153 (6th)
1926 AL  152 (8th)
1927 AL  151 (5th)
1928 AL  154 (3rd)
Career  2,503 (59th)
1921 AL  693 (7th)
1923 AL  699 (2nd)
1924 AL  681 (7th)
1927 AL  691 (3rd)
1928 AL  684 (5th)
1930 AL  676 (7th)
Career  10,626 (50th)
1919 AL  103 (1st)
1920 AL  158 (1st)
1921 AL  177 (1st)
1923 AL  151 (1st)
1924 AL  143 (1st)
1926 AL  139 (1st)
1927 AL  158 (1st)
1928 AL  163 (1st)
1929 AL  121 (5th)
1930 AL  150 (2nd)
1931 AL  149 (2nd)
1932 AL  120 (6th)
Career  2,174 (4th)
1921 AL  204 (6th)
1923 AL  205 (4th)
1924 AL  200 (4th)
1926 AL  184 (9th)
1927 AL  192 (6th)
1928 AL  173 (9th)
1931 AL  199 (4th)
Career  2,873 (46th)
Total BasesDoublesTriplesHome Runs
1918 AL  176 (8th)
1919 AL  284 (1st)
1920 AL  388 (2nd)
1921 AL  457 (1st)
1922 AL  273 (9th)
1923 AL  399 (1st)
1924 AL  391 (1st)
1926 AL  365 (1st)
1927 AL  417 (2nd)
1928 AL  380 (1st)
1929 AL  348 (3rd)
1930 AL  379 (3rd)
1931 AL  374 (2nd)
1932 AL  302 (7th)
Career  5,793 (8th)
1918 AL  26 (2nd)
1919 AL  34 (5th)
1921 AL  44 (2nd)
1923 AL  45 (3rd)
1924 AL  39 (6th)
Career  506 (59th)
1918 AL  11 (5th)
1919 AL  12 (6th)
1921 AL  16 (4th)
1923 AL  13 (5th)
Career  136 (71st)
1915 AL  4 (9th)
1918 AL  11 (1st)
1919 AL  29 (1st)
1920 AL  54 (1st)
1921 AL  59 (1st)
1922 AL  35 (3rd)
1923 AL  41 (1st)
1924 AL  46 (1st)
1925 AL  25 (2nd)
1926 AL  47 (1st)
1927 AL  60 (1st)
1928 AL  54 (1st)
1929 AL  46 (1st)
1930 AL  49 (1st)
1931 AL  46 (1st)
1932 AL  41 (2nd)
1933 AL  34 (2nd)
1934 AL  22 (8th)
Career  714 (3rd)
Runs Batted InBases on BallsStrikeoutsStolen Bases
1918 AL  61 (6th)
1919 AL  113 (1st)
1920 AL  135 (1st)
1921 AL  168 (1st)
1922 AL  96 (8th)
1923 AL  130 (1st)
1924 AL  124 (2nd)
1926 AL  153 (1st)
1927 AL  165 (2nd)
1928 AL  146 (2nd)
1929 AL  154 (2nd)
1930 AL  153 (4th)
1931 AL  162 (2nd)
1932 AL  137 (4th)
1933 AL  104 (8th)
Career  2,214 (3rd)
1918 AL  58 (8th)
1919 AL  101 (2nd)
1920 AL  150 (1st)
1921 AL  145 (1st)
1922 AL  84 (2nd)
1923 AL  170 (1st)
1924 AL  142 (1st)
1926 AL  144 (1st)
1927 AL  137 (1st)
1928 AL  137 (1st)
1929 AL  72 (10th)
1930 AL  136 (1st)
1931 AL  128 (1st)
1932 AL  130 (1st)
1933 AL  114 (1st)
1934 AL  104 (3rd)
Career  2,062 (3rd)
1918 AL  58 (1st)
1919 AL  58 (2nd)
1920 AL  80 (2nd)
1921 AL  81 (2nd)
1922 AL  80 (2nd)
1923 AL  93 (1st)
1924 AL  81 (1st)
1925 AL  68 (2nd)
1926 AL  76 (2nd)
1927 AL  89 (1st)
1928 AL  87 (1st)
1929 AL  60 (4th)
1930 AL  61 (5th)
1932 AL  62 (9th)
1933 AL  90 (2nd)
1934 AL  63 (9th)
Career  1,330 (142nd)
1921 AL  17 (8th)
1923 AL  17 (9th)
Adjusted OPS+Runs CreatedAdj. Batting RunsAdj. Batting Wins
1918 AL  192 (2nd)
1919 AL  217 (1st)
1920 AL  255 (1st)
1921 AL  239 (1st)
1922 AL  182 (1st)
1923 AL  239 (1st)
1924 AL  220 (1st)
1926 AL  226 (1st)
1927 AL  225 (1st)
1928 AL  206 (1st)
1929 AL  193 (1st)
1930 AL  211 (1st)
1931 AL  218 (1st)
1932 AL  201 (2nd)
1933 AL  176 (3rd)
1934 AL  160 (3rd)
Career  206 (1st)
1918 AL  72 (7th)
1919 AL  128 (1st)
1920 AL  200 (1st)
1921 AL  229 (1st)
1922 AL  116 (5th)
1923 AL  209 (1st)
1924 AL  194 (1st)
1926 AL  185 (1st)
1927 AL  201 (2nd)
1928 AL  173 (1st)
1929 AL  148 (1st)
1930 AL  183 (2nd)
1931 AL  184 (1st)
1932 AL  147 (3rd)
1933 AL  116 (3rd)
Career  2,718 (2nd)
1918 AL  37 (2nd)
1919 AL  72 (1st)
1920 AL  114 (1st)
1921 AL  120 (1st)
1922 AL  50 (5th)
1923 AL  121 (1st)
1924 AL  104 (1st)
1926 AL  101 (1st)
1927 AL  104 (2nd)
1928 AL  88 (1st)
1929 AL  67 (1st)
1930 AL  95 (1st)
1931 AL  98 (1st)
1932 AL  76 (2nd)
1933 AL  55 (3rd)
1934 AL  38 (7th)
Career  1,384 (1st)
1918 AL  4.1 (2nd)
1919 AL  7.3 (1st)
1920 AL  10.8 (1st)
1921 AL  10.9 (1st)
1922 AL  4.8 (5th)
1923 AL  11.3 (1st)
1924 AL  9.6 (1st)
1926 AL  9.5 (1st)
1927 AL  9.6 (2nd)
1928 AL  8.3 (1st)
1929 AL  6.2 (1st)
1930 AL  8.5 (1st)
1931 AL  9.0 (1st)
1932 AL  7.0 (2nd)
1933 AL  5.3 (3rd)
1934 AL  3.6 (7th)
Career  130.0 (1st)
Extra Base HitsTimes On BaseOffensive Win %Hit By Pitch
1918 AL  48 (1st)
1919 AL  75 (1st)
1920 AL  99 (1st)
1921 AL  119 (1st)
1922 AL  67 (4th)
1923 AL  99 (1st)
1924 AL  92 (1st)
1926 AL  82 (2nd)
1927 AL  97 (2nd)
1928 AL  91 (1st)
1929 AL  78 (3rd)
1930 AL  86 (3rd)
1931 AL  80 (3rd)
1933 AL  58 (9th)
Career  1,356 (5th)
1919 AL  246 (1st)
1920 AL  325 (1st)
1921 AL  353 (1st)
1923 AL  379 (1st)
1924 AL  346 (1st)
1926 AL  331 (1st)
1927 AL  329 (2nd)
1928 AL  313 (1st)
1930 AL  323 (2nd)
1931 AL  328 (1st)
1932 AL  288 (3rd)
1933 AL  254 (9th)
Career  4,978 (9th)
1918 AL  .841 (2nd)
1919 AL  .872 (1st)
1920 AL  .921 (1st)
1921 AL  .905 (1st)
1922 AL  .819 (3rd)
1923 AL  .909 (1st)
1924 AL  .885 (1st)
1926 AL  .893 (1st)
1927 AL  .882 (1st)
1928 AL  .851 (1st)
1929 AL  .825 (1st)
1930 AL  .848 (1st)
1931 AL  .879 (1st)
1932 AL  .851 (2nd)
1933 AL  .782 (3rd)
1934 AL  .733 (7th)
Career  .858 (1st)
1919 AL  6 (9th)
Sacrifice HitsIntentional Bases on BallsCaught StealingPower-Speed #
1930 AL  21 (5th)1928 AL  8 (1st)
1929 AL  5 (4th)
1930 AL  8 (2nd)
1931 AL  5 (10th)
1920 AL  14 (10th)
1921 AL  13 (6th)
1923 AL  21 (2nd)
1924 AL  13 (7th)
1930 AL  10 (7th)
Career  117 (70th)
1918 AL  7.8 (2nd)
1919 AL  11.3 (3rd)
1920 AL  22.2 (2nd)
1921 AL  26.4 (1st)
1923 AL  24.0 (1st)
1924 AL  15.1 (3rd)
1926 AL  17.8 (1st)
1927 AL  12.5 (4th)
1930 AL  16.6 (5th)
Career  209.8 (87th)
AB per HRBase-Out Runs Added (RE24)Win Probability Added (WPA)Situ. Wins Added (WPA/LI)
1918 AL  28.8 (1st)
1919 AL  14.9 (1st)
1920 AL  8.5 (1st)
1921 AL  9.2 (1st)
1922 AL  11.6 (1st)
1923 AL  12.7 (1st)
1924 AL  11.5 (1st)
1926 AL  10.5 (1st)
1927 AL  9.0 (1st)
1928 AL  9.9 (1st)
1929 AL  10.8 (1st)
1930 AL  10.6 (1st)
1931 AL  11.6 (1st)
1932 AL  11.1 (2nd)
1933 AL  13.5 (2nd)
1934 AL  16.6 (4th)
Career  11.8 (2nd)
1918 AL  19.66 (3rd)
1919 AL  30.31 (1st)
1920 AL  108.66 (1st)
1921 AL  115.85 (1st)
1922 AL  54.64 (3rd)
1923 AL  112.95 (1st)
1924 AL  108.03 (1st)
1926 AL  111.05 (1st)
1927 AL  111.32 (2nd)
1928 AL  92.10 (2nd)
1929 AL  81.66 (1st)
1930 AL  92.90 (3rd)
1931 AL  104.93 (1st)
1932 AL  79.52 (3rd)
1933 AL  53.65 (3rd)
1934 AL  47.45 (6th)
Career  1,341.13 (2nd)
1918 AL  2.7 (3rd)
1919 AL  4.1 (1st)
1920 AL  8.0 (1st)
1921 AL  9.1 (1st)
1922 AL  4.9 (1st)
1923 AL  11.1 (1st)
1924 AL  8.0 (1st)
1926 AL  9.4 (1st)
1927 AL  8.6 (2nd)
1928 AL  7.4 (2nd)
1929 AL  9.2 (1st)
1930 AL  4.0 (6th)
1931 AL  8.8 (1st)
1932 AL  6.9 (3rd)
1933 AL  3.6 (6th)
1934 AL  3.8 (9th)
Career  111.4 (2nd)
1918 AL  1.3 (8th)
1919 AL  2.9 (1st)
1920 AL  10.8 (1st)
1921 AL  9.9 (1st)
1922 AL  5.4 (1st)
1923 AL  9.8 (1st)
1924 AL  10.1 (1st)
1926 AL  9.6 (1st)
1927 AL  10.3 (1st)
1928 AL  8.7 (1st)
1929 AL  6.5 (1st)
1930 AL  8.1 (1st)
1931 AL  8.4 (1st)
1932 AL  6.9 (2nd)
1933 AL  5.2 (3rd)
1934 AL  4.1 (7th)
Career  121.0 (2nd)
Championship WPA (cWPA)Base-Out Wins Added (REW)WAR for PitchersEarned Run Average
1918 AL  11.6 (1st)
1919 AL  2.1 (10th)
1920 AL  25.8 (1st)
1921 AL  40.1 (1st)
1922 AL  21.2 (1st)
1923 AL  14.0 (1st)
1924 AL  30.4 (1st)
1926 AL  26.1 (1st)
1927 AL  11.7 (2nd)
1928 AL  17.1 (2nd)
1929 AL  8.8 (1st)
1930 AL  4.1 (8th)
1931 AL  6.4 (2nd)
1932 AL  15.0 (2nd)
1933 AL  9.7 (2nd)
1934 AL  9.0 (6th)
Career  251.8 (1st)
1918 AL  2.2 (3rd)
1919 AL  3.2 (1st)
1920 AL  10.1 (1st)
1921 AL  10.4 (1st)
1922 AL  5.1 (3rd)
1923 AL  10.5 (1st)
1924 AL  10.0 (1st)
1926 AL  10.5 (1st)
1927 AL  10.4 (2nd)
1928 AL  8.7 (2nd)
1929 AL  7.7 (1st)
1930 AL  8.4 (2nd)
1931 AL  9.9 (1st)
1932 AL  7.5 (3rd)
1933 AL  5.3 (3rd)
1934 AL  4.5 (6th)
Career  125.9 (2nd)
1916 AL  8.8 (2nd)
1917 AL  6.5 (5th)
1916 AL  1.75 (1st)
1917 AL  2.01 (7th)
1918 AL  2.22 (9th)
Career  2.28 (17th)
WinsWin-Loss %Walks & Hits per IPHits per 9 IP
1915 AL  18 (9th)
1916 AL  23 (3rd)
1917 AL  24 (2nd)
1915 AL  .692 (4th)
1916 AL  .657 (5th)
1917 AL  .649 (6th)
1918 AL  .650 (2nd)
1919 AL  .643 (10th)
Career  .671 (16th)
1916 AL  1.075 (5th)
1917 AL  1.079 (6th)
1918 AL  1.046 (2nd)
Career  1.159 (87th)
1915 AL  6.864 (2nd)
1916 AL  6.395 (1st)
1917 AL  6.729 (3rd)
1918 AL  6.764 (4th)
Career  7.177 (16th)
Strikeouts per 9 IPSavesInnings PitchedStrikeouts
1915 AL  4.631 (8th)
1916 AL  4.727 (8th)
1919 AL  1 (10th)1916 AL  323.7 (3rd)
1917 AL  326.3 (2nd)
1916 AL  170 (3rd)
1917 AL  128 (5th)
Games StartedComplete GamesShutoutsBases on Balls
1916 AL  40 (1st)
1917 AL  38 (2nd)
1916 AL  23 (4th)
1917 AL  35 (1st)
1918 AL  18 (9th)
1916 AL  9 (1st)
1917 AL  6 (5th)
1916 AL  118 (3rd)
1917 AL  108 (3rd)
HitsStrikeouts / Base On BallsHome Runs per 9 IPEarned Runs
1916 AL  230 (10th)
1917 AL  244 (7th)
1916 AL  1.441 (10th)1916 AL  0.000 (1st)
Career  0.074 (13th)
1917 AL  73 (10th)
Wild PitchesHit By PitchBatters FacedAdjusted ERA+
1915 AL  9 (4th)
1919 AL  5 (6th)
1916 AL  8 (7th)
1917 AL  11 (6th)
1916 AL  1,272 (3rd)
1917 AL  1,277 (2nd)
1916 AL  158 (1st)
1917 AL  128 (7th)
1918 AL  122 (10th)
Career  122 (106th)
Fielding Independent PitchingAdj. Pitching RunsAdj. Pitching WinsBase-Out Runs Saved (RE24)
1916 AL  2.43 (6th)
1917 AL  2.65 (10th)
Career  2.81 (78th)
1916 AL  37 (1st)
1917 AL  24 (5th)
1918 AL  10 (10th)
1916 AL  4.4 (1st)
1917 AL  2.8 (5th)
1918 AL  1.2 (10th)
1916 AL  34.21 (1st)
1917 AL  17.15 (5th)
Win Probability Added (WPA)Sit. Wins Saved (WPA/LI)Championship WPA (cWPA)Base-Out Wins Saved (REW)
1916 AL  3.5 (4th)
1917 AL  2.3 (6th)
1916 AL  3.4 (2nd)
1917 AL  1.0 (10th)
1915 AL  2.1 (10th)
1916 AL  11.6 (3rd)
1917 AL  8.3 (2nd)
1918 AL  8.2 (3rd)
Career  30.7 (75th)
1916 AL  4.1 (1st)
1917 AL  2.0 (5th)
Putouts as LF (s.1901)Assists as LF (s.1901)Errors Committed as LF (s.1901)Double Plays Turned as LF (s.1901)
1921 AL  276 (5th)
Career  1,978 (60th)
1919 AL  14 (2nd)
1921 AL  15 (4th)
Career  76 (61st)
1918 AL  6 (5th)
Career  61 (51st)
1918 AL  3 (4th)
1919 AL  4 (2nd)
1921 AL  4 (3rd)
1923 AL  1 (4th)
1926 AL  3 (3rd)
1927 AL  1 (5th)
1933 AL  3 (2nd)
Career  22 (25th)
Def. Games as RF (s.1901)Putouts as RF (s.1901)Assists as RF (s.1901)Errors Committed as RF (s.1901)
1927 AL  94 (5th)
1931 AL  91 (5th)
Career  1,128 (67th)
1924 AL  232 (5th)
1927 AL  194 (5th)
1928 AL  205 (4th)
1930 AL  170 (5th)
Career  2,146 (57th)
1920 AL  19 (2nd)
1925 AL  11 (4th)
1927 AL  10 (5th)
1932 AL  8 (4th)
Career  114 (42nd)
1920 AL  9 (3rd)
1924 AL  10 (3rd)
1927 AL  10 (4th)
1928 AL  6 (5th)
1931 AL  5 (5th)
1932 AL  6 (4th)
1934 AL  6 (4th)
Career  84 (26th)
Double Plays Turned as RF (s.1901)Def. Games as OFPutouts as OFErrors Committed as OF
1920 AL  2 (5th)
1924 AL  4 (4th)
1925 AL  3 (4th)
1927 AL  3 (5th)
1931 AL  2 (4th)
1932 AL  1 (4th)
Career  20 (82nd)
1921 AL  152 (2nd)
1923 AL  148 (5th)
1924 AL  152 (4th)
1926 AL  149 (4th)
1927 AL  151 (2nd)
1928 AL  154 (1st)
Career  2,241 (27th)
1921 AL  348 (4th)
1923 AL  378 (3rd)
Career  4,444 (48th)
1920 AL  19 (3rd)
1924 AL  14 (2nd)
Career  155 (61st)
Double Plays Turned as OFPutouts as PAssists as PErrors Committed as P
1921 AL  5 (4th)
1926 AL  5 (4th)
1933 AL  4 (3rd)
Career  45 (47th)
1915 AL  17 (3rd)
1916 AL  24 (1st)
1917 AL  19 (4th)
1918 AL  19 (1st)
1917 AL  101 (2nd)1918 AL  6 (5th)
Double Plays Turned as PRange Factor/Game as LF (s.1901)Fielding % as LF (s.1901)Range Factor/Game as RF (s.1901)
1916 AL  6 (2nd)1919 AL  2.05 (5th)
1921 AL  2.20 (5th)
1926 AL  2.16 (4th)
Career  1.96 (93rd)
1919 AL  .996 (1st)
1921 AL  .970 (3rd)
1920 AL  1.93 (4th)
1924 AL  2.46 (1st)
1927 AL  2.17 (1st)
1928 AL  2.14 (1st)
1929 AL  1.66 (4th)
1930 AL  1.93 (2nd)
1934 AL  1.75 (3rd)
Career  2.00 (51st)
Range Factor/Game as OFFielding % as OFRange Factor/9Inn as PRange Factor/Game as P
1923 AL  2.69 (3rd)1919 AL  .996 (1st)
1926 AL  .979 (3rd)
1929 AL  .984 (4th)
1918 AL  4.17 (3rd)1915 AL  2.50 (5th)
1917 AL  2.93 (5th)
1918 AL  3.85 (2nd)
Career  2.75 (32nd)
Fielding % as POldestYoungest 
1915 AL  .976 (5th)1932 AL  born 1895-02-06 (8th)
1933 AL  born 1895-02-06 (9th)
1934 AL  born 1895-02-06 (10th)
1935 NL  born 1895-02-06 (5th)
1914 AL  born 1895-02-06 (8th) 

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